Archives For Jared Taylor

Quiztones-Screenshots

If you mix, recognizing frequencies is probably the most valuable technical skill you can develop. With that in mind, here’s a product I love and have been using for years.

Quiztones is an ear training app for audio engineers. Quiztones scores you on a number of listening tests designed to improve your ability to recognize specific frequency ranges. The simplest is a series of sine wave frequencies, choosing from options at least an octave apart. The most challenging is a +5 dB EQ boost on an audio track you choose from your library, or the built-in instrument samples in the Quiztones library. All quizzes consist of ten multiple choice “questions” and are scored out of 1000. Continue Reading…

http://www.guitarchalk.com/2014/11/guitar-and-contemporary-worship-melody.html

http://www.guitarchalk.com/2014/11/guitar-and-contemporary-worship-melody.html

The full title is Worship Guitar Chord Structures and Melodies: Triadic Improvisation Workshop. That’s a hefty title introducing an equally heavy topic, but the payoff is huge: great melodies. Who doesn’t want that?

The post is lengthy, so don’t attempt to read it on your phone. It contains chord diagrams and tablature, making it easy to follow along with your guitar. It walks through how to develop melodies based on the chord structure of a song by starting with three note guitar chords (triads) as a roadmap for improvisation.

This is a critical bit of understanding in musical improvisation. From a jazz theory perspective, every chord can be seen as a scale waiting to take shape. Visualizing these scales as they relate to the underlying chords helps provide the vocabulary for musical improvisation and melody making. Continue Reading…

Worship Shapes Us

Jared Taylor —  November 21, 2014 — 1 Comment

Plastoceine-Cross

Google says worship is “the feeling or expression of reverence and adoration for a deity.” This seems like a good definition. Worship is our response to God for who He is, what He’s done, for His character and acts of grace toward us. God delivers the goods, and we express our response in worship. Right?

Of course! It wasn’t a trick question. That is a true statement about worship, and one we’re not likely to disagree over.

And yet I don’t think worship as expression is a complete picture. I think there’s more going on when we gather. Here are a some questions to tinker with: What is God’s involvement in worship? What makes worship better or worse? If worship is our expression, then does the quality of worship depend on us? Does God need us to worship? If he does, then how can we say God is self-sustaining? If he doesn’t, then why do we spend so much time and effort on it? Continue Reading…

The Family Band

Jared Taylor —  November 6, 2014 — 1 Comment

Family-Band-option-1

Grandpa Taylor was an impeccable whistler. Legend has it, one time a church brought him in as a guest singer and assigned him one of the special seats on the dais until his performance. During the prelude he was casually whistling along, as he was wont to do. When it came time for him to “minister through music” the pastor introduced him and said,

“Pastor Taylor, I couldn’t help but hear you whistling earlier and it so ministered to my soul that I wonder if, instead of singing the song you prepared, you would whistle it for us instead.”

Grandpa accepted. According to the story, by verse two, one hundred souls had been added to the Book of Life.

Continue Reading…

DI-box

Seems fairly straightforward, right? A 1/4″ cable connects the instrument to the DI box. Is there really a right and wrong way to do this?

As far as sound quality is concerned, no. There’s nothing more to it than plugging into the correct jack. The difference I’m talking about is whether or not you cause a loud “pop” in the system. There are two connections to be made: one at the guitar and the other at the DI box. And the order in which they are connected determines whether or not you get a “pop”.

HOW TO STOP THE “POP”

Continue Reading…

Does Excellence Honour God?

Jared Taylor —  October 29, 2014 — 7 Comments
The Meeting House - Christmas Eve 2013

a shot from our Christmas Eve service last year–a most excellent service.

Excellence honours God and inspires people.

This nugget of wisdom helped fuel the seeker-sensitive movement and these days it seems more popular than ever! I’ve been a part of some great organizations that affirmed this value, and leveraged it to do some great work with some really great people. But honestly this value statement has always made me a bit uncomfortable.

It can manifest itself in the belief among Christian artists that we should be “better” than “the world” at things like songwriting, film-making and laser-light shows. The conversation plays out something like this: Continue Reading…

Feeling Time

Jared Taylor —  October 20, 2014 — Leave a comment

Tele Time

It’s hard to overstate the importance of time in music. On a macro level, time is about tempo: how fast or slow is a song and are we following it. But on the micro level, we can talk about something called “time feel”: the subtle way musicians interpret time as they subdivide beats.

Subdividing beats simply means dividing larger beats into smaller beats. Whole notes can be divided into half notes, then quarters, eighths, sixteenths, thirty-secondths and so on. Mathematically speaking, these subdivisions are very simple to place on a grid. But human beings subdivide beats in our heads, we don’t always do it with flawless mathematical exactness. Subtly and often unconsciously, we push and pull certain beats in a pattern that is repeatable, but hard to deconstruct. Continue Reading…

When it Clicks

Jared Taylor —  October 16, 2014 — Leave a comment

96-bpm

My first guitar teacher and I lasted six months before I broke it off. I wasn’t being challenged, and felt I was learning more from guitar magazines than the guy we were paying every week. If you know me, this will make sense–I needed to know I was learning the correct way. I needed assurance that we were starting from the beginning and taking all the right steps. So we did a bit of homework, bought a classical guitar and a footrest, and I started up with one of the best guitar teachers in the region.

I’ll never forget my first and sixth lessons. My sixth lesson was thirty minutes dedicated to proper nail-filing technique. But my first lesson was my first time using a metronome. We used the metronome ALL THE TIME. It was ticking when I came into the lesson, it was ticking when I left, it ticked in the background while my teacher gave me feedback. The constant ticking was enough to drive you mad, but you know how they say there’s a fine line between madness and genius?

Continue Reading…

9Vs-processed

Through high school I worked at a music store, mostly in the guitar department. I can’t tell you how many times a client would bring in a relatively new acoustic guitar, complaining that it was distorting or had no sound coming out. A familiar call and answer would then ensue:

Me: “did you check the battery?”

Customer:  “it has a battery?!”

Continue Reading…

Qu16-EQ-section-2

We’ve already done a 3-part series on EQ, and we covered the critical listening skills required to use it, instrument by instrument, in our series “Taking It Apart”. These posts are great learning material, and I highly recommend looking back at them.

Our locations are getting new digital sound consoles. This is exciting for a number of reasons, one of which is EQ. Our old consoles were analog and had semi-parametric EQ, which means they had some of the functionality of a parametric EQ, but were missing a few features. In our case, the high and low frequency bands were fixed shelf filters. The high mid and low-mid bands were sweepable filters, but there were no width or Q adjustments.

Okay stop — if that last sentence confused the heck out of you, you really need to go back and read at least the overview post from the original EQ series.

Continue Reading…