Archives For Bass Guitar

DI-box

Seems fairly straightforward, right? A 1/4″ cable connects the instrument to the DI box. Is there really a right and wrong way to do this?

As far as sound quality is concerned, no. There’s nothing more to it than plugging into the correct jack. The difference I’m talking about is whether or not you cause a loud “pop” in the system. There are two connections to be made: one at the guitar and the other at the DI box. And the order in which they are connected determines whether or not you get a “pop”.

HOW TO STOP THE “POP”

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Feeling Time

Jared Taylor —  October 20, 2014 — Leave a comment

Tele Time

It’s hard to overstate the importance of time in music. On a macro level, time is about tempo: how fast or slow is a song and are we following it. But on the micro level, we can talk about something called “time feel”: the subtle way musicians interpret time as they subdivide beats.

Subdividing beats simply means dividing larger beats into smaller beats. Whole notes can be divided into half notes, then quarters, eighths, sixteenths, thirty-secondths and so on. Mathematically speaking, these subdivisions are very simple to place on a grid. But human beings subdivide beats in our heads, we don’t always do it with flawless mathematical exactness. Subtly and often unconsciously, we push and pull certain beats in a pattern that is repeatable, but hard to deconstruct. Continue Reading…

When it Clicks

Jared Taylor —  October 16, 2014 — Leave a comment

96-bpm

My first guitar teacher and I lasted six months before I broke it off. I wasn’t being challenged, and felt I was learning more from guitar magazines than the guy we were paying every week. If you know me, this will make sense–I needed to know I was learning the correct way. I needed assurance that we were starting from the beginning and taking all the right steps. So we did a bit of homework, bought a classical guitar and a footrest, and I started up with one of the best guitar teachers in the region.

I’ll never forget my first and sixth lessons. My sixth lesson was thirty minutes dedicated to proper nail-filing technique. But my first lesson was my first time using a metronome. We used the metronome ALL THE TIME. It was ticking when I came into the lesson, it was ticking when I left, it ticked in the background while my teacher gave me feedback. The constant ticking was enough to drive you mad, but you know how they say there’s a fine line between madness and genius?

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9Vs-processed

Through high school I worked at a music store, mostly in the guitar department. I can’t tell you how many times a client would bring in a relatively new acoustic guitar, complaining that it was distorting or had no sound coming out. A familiar call and answer would then ensue:

Me: “did you check the battery?”

Customer:  “it has a battery?!”

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Blog - Sonic Range 1

When playing together in a band context, by now, I think we would all agree that the sonic range I’m playing in (the octave I’m singing or playing my instrument in) is just as important as the rhythms I’m playing, right? Knowing this importance is one thing, but working it out in rehearsal can be very challenging and time consuming.

If there’s one instrument that runs the highest risk of eating the whole pie (100%) in the sonic plane, it’s the keyboard. The lowest note on the keyboard is an A – two semi-tones lower than the low B on a 5-string bass guitar. If your bassist is playing a 4 string, the piano has a whole 5th below the low E on the bass. No one in the band can possibly play those notes in the low A-E range except the piano player. You might think, “Great!  Sonic room for me to play without worrying about anyone else running into me.” Well, let me put it this way, if there’s a bass guitar player in your band, let them live up to their name and actually be the bass player in the band. Keyboardists, let the bassists have their range and take that left hand and bring it up the keyboard.  I know, that’s almost two whole octaves chopped off of the low end of the keyboard. There is an exception to almost every rule, but when it comes to the keyboardist’s left hand, I wouldn’t have it playing much lower than the C that is one octave below middle C. When keyboard players get their left hand away from what the bass player is playing, the sound will significantly tidy itself up and the listener will feel more depth to the overall sound.

There is an exception to almost every rule, but when it comes to the keyboardist’s left hand, I wouldn’t have it playing much lower than the C that is one octave below middle C.

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Sonic Range Photo

Whoever could have guessed that musicians had to think so much when they jumped into a band context? If I’m a great player of my instrument, I should be able to step into any setting and sound good! Unfortunately, without experience as a band member, this is likely not the case.

We’ve been talking about the horizontal “rhythmic” plane (as we call it) of playing together within the 100% rule.  If you don’t know what I mean, go back and read “Playing Together as a Band: Rhythm Playing“.  We know that there is so much more to talk about in each of these areas, but for the sake of keeping everyone’s interest, let’s move onto the vertical plane of sonic ranges.

Imagine this … Continue Reading…

A new year is before us — new excitements, new joys, new challenges …
I’m going to let Tim Day, the Sr. Pastor of The Meeting House, take the first post of 2013.

This is for anyone who is involved in a weekend service context. Musicians and techs alike, be inspired and join with us to make way for the Spirit moving in our communities, and to be used to raise the temperature of our weekend services!

(Having trouble viewing this video? Click here: http://youtu.be/6qP2DZHsLAo)

I Lift My Eyes Up

We interrupt this current series to bring you a crucial piece of information …

Think about an in-person conversation that you had with someone today. Not about what was said, but about what was done. Or, if you haven’t seen anyone yet today, stop reading this point, go find someone, have a conversation about the weather, and come back to finish reading this post.  Continue Reading…

Part 4 of 8 in the series Taking It Apart

Bass

The bass guitar is glue that holds the band together.

I have no idea what this analogy means. I’ve heard it said about bass – and almost everything else on stage – and I cringe every time I hear it! But, I shouldn’t complain without an alternative, so I’ll offer my own view of how the bass functions in pop/rock music: Continue Reading…

And we’re starting to build the band now. We’ve spoken to the consistency of the drums, now it’s time to add another instrument. You probably know what instrument makes the most sense to add at this point (because it’s in the title of this post) — the bass guitar.

There are many reasons the bass fits logically into the puzzle piece that we have in the drums right now. Sticking with the “100% rule” logic here, the bass fits in with the kick drum on the drum set. Why? For one reason, the sonic range is actually similar. Hanging out around that 50-150Hz mark, both instruments are more often felt than they are heard in the mix. Secondly, when both instruments (kick & bass) line up their primary accents, the groove of the song becomes clear for the rest of the band to build on top of.  Continue Reading…